Taliban Rule Is Worrying for Vulnerable Children?
Taliban Rule Is Worrying for Vulnerable Children?

Taliban Rule Is Worrying for Vulnerable Children?

Afghanistan is capturing the world’s attention as the nation rapidly slips into the hands of the Taliban. Since Kabul descended into turmoil in mid-August, images of desolation have persisted in news outlets. Babies carried over barbed wire gates at Kabul International Airport demonstrate the depth of parents’ desperation. Over 75,000 internally displaced youngsters have found their way to improvised shelters in neighborhood parks or to camps outside the city. And, as the Taliban retakes control in a shattered state, we wonder what will happen to Afghanistan’s young.

Before the conflict, the Taliban had an excess.

The Taliban governed Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001, before the American military intervention. Women were required to remain at home (unless accompanied by a male relative) and to wear a complete burqa in public, according to a stringent interpretation of Sharia. Girls did not attend school except in secret since they could not join the professions. Crimes such as stealing were punished by amputation; minority ethnic groups were often persecuted, and cassettes scattered in the woods when music was criminalized. Many people worry that the new government will be similar to the pre-war dystopia.

During the conflict, children were subjected to horrors.

Afghanistan is regarded as one of the most dangerous locations in the world for children. The war’s brutality has contributed significantly to such connotation. Children have been subjected to violence at the hands of everyone. Over 2,600 youngsters were murdered or wounded in 2020 alone. The Taliban and other armed organizations attacked 62 schools (primary schools for girls). In addition, opposing factions had recruited 172 youths for fighting duties.

Other sobering UNICEF (2018) statistics include: nearly half of all 1-year-old children had not received their essential vaccines, 2 in 5 children were unable to reach full mental or physical development, 1.3 million children under the age of five required treatment for acute malnutrition, and 3.7 million children were not enrolled in school.

There is no place for a little girl in this world.

The last twenty years have seen significant growth of women’s rights due to the influence of the United States and international pressure. Young females started to be educated. There was hope for young women to become anything other than homemakers. That progress is now in danger of being undone. Some Afghans are concerned that, despite the Taliban’s pretense of being more moderate this time, they cannot be trusted to protect women’s rights and that the old rule of law will be restored.

According to one BBC report, Dr. Ahmad Sarmast was the Afghanistan National Institute of Music director until the current insurgency. Boys and girls were trained to perform traditional Afghan music at the institution, frequently in the same room. He asked the orphan and the street child to observe him and learn from him. It was a vision of what education might be in Afghanistan. Since August, everyone has been returned home, and the program’s future is unclear.

In an interview with a news source, World Vision’s national director in Afghanistan said, “Children were extremely free.” They used to go about in gorgeous clothes. But now I’m not sure if. they have to cover themselves like women altogether.”

A life apart from the savagery.

Thousands of refugees are being removed as countries with a foothold in Afghanistan fly their people out of Kabul. Some of these instances involve unaccompanied children. While every effort is made to place children with family members, some youngsters may ultimately need to join their new state’s foster care system.

Furthermore, several families who were already in the process of adopting Afghan children are worried. They are attempting to transfer those youngsters out of the country as soon as possible, fearing that the Taliban would not honor adoption arrangements with foreign citizens.

Whatever happens to the handful who escape the war and hardship, the overwhelming majority of Afghan children will stay in Afghanistan. Surely there must be better options for the youngsters who remain?

A thousand children’s mothers.

Mahboba Rawi, a lady, believes the new government would leave her alone to continue her job. Rawi, the self-proclaimed “mother of a thousand children,” is an Afghan lady residing in Australia whose organization operates four orphanages, five schools, and a medical facility in Afghanistan.

But she is concerned, and her staff members paint a bleak picture of what is going on on the ground. Her organization, along with other humanitarian organizations, is now focusing on meeting the needs of all the additional unaccompanied minors who have arrived at camps and shelters due to the violence. But what happens after the dust settles on their access?

Above all, there is uncertainty.

Nobody knows what the next several months will bring. When is the bloodshed going to stop? Like the children we deal with in our orphanages and foster homes, Afghanistan’s resilient youngsters will continue to have aspirations and ambitions for their future. Will they be successful in obtaining them? What are individuals in the nation and across the globe prepared to do to provide these children a brighter future? Taliban dominance

Afghanistan is capturing the world’s attention as the nation rapidly slips into the hands of the Taliban. Since Kabul descended into turmoil in mid-August, images of desolation have persisted in news outlets. Babies carried over barbed wire gates at Kabul International Airport demonstrate the depth of parents’ desperation. Over 75,000 internally displaced youngsters have found their way to improvised shelters in neighborhood parks or to camps outside the city. And, as the Taliban retakes control in a shattered state, we wonder what will happen to Afghanistan’s young.

Before the conflict, the Taliban had an excess.

The Taliban governed Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001, before the American military intervention. Women were required to remain at home (unless accompanied by a male relative) and to wear a complete burqa in public, according to a stringent interpretation of Sharia. Girls did not attend school except in secret since they could not join the professions. Crimes such as stealing were punished by amputation; minority ethnic groups were often persecuted, and cassettes scattered in the woods when most music was criminalized. Many people worry that the new government will be similar to the pre-war dystopia.

During the conflict, children were subjected to horrors.

Afghanistan is regarded as one of the most dangerous locations in the world for children. The war’s brutality has contributed significantly to such connotation. Children have been subjected to violence at the hands of everyone. Over 2,600 youngsters were murdered or wounded in 2020 alone. The Taliban and other armed organizations attacked 62 schools (primary schools for girls). In addition, opposing factions had recruited 172 youths for fighting duties.

Other sobering UNICEF (2018) statistics include: nearly half of all 1-year-old children had not received their essential vaccines, 2 in 5 children were unable to reach full mental or physical development, 1.3 million children under the age of five required treatments for acute malnutrition, and 3.7 million children were not enrolled in school.

There is no place for a little girl in this world.

The last twenty years have seen significant growth of women’s rights due to the influence of the United States and international pressure. Young females started to be educated. There was hope for young women to become anything other than homemakers. That progress is now in danger of being undone. Some Afghans are concerned that, despite the Taliban’s pretense of being more moderate this time, they cannot be trusted to protect women’s rights and that the old rule of law will be restored.

According to one BBC report, Dr. Ahmad Sarmast was the Afghanistan National Institute of Music director until the current insurgency. Boys and girls were trained to perform traditional Afghan music at the institution, frequently in the same room. He asked the orphan and the street child to observe him and learn from him. It was a vision of what education might be in Afghanistan. Since August, everyone has been returned home, and the program’s future is unclear.

In an interview with a news source, World Vision’s national director in Afghanistan said, “Children were extremely free.” They used to go about in beautiful clothes. But now I’m not sure if. they have to cover themselves like women altogether.”

A life apart from the savagery.

Thousands of refugees are being removed as countries with a foothold in Afghanistan fly their people out of Kabul. Some of these instances involve unaccompanied children. While every effort is made to place children with family members, some youngsters may ultimately need to join their new state’s foster care system. Furthermore, several families who were already in the process of adopting Afghan children are worried. They are attempting to transfer those youngsters out of the country as soon as possible, fearing that the Taliban would not honor adoption arrangements with foreign citizens. Whatever happens to the handful who escape the war and hardship, the overwhelming majority of Afghan children will stay in Afghanistan. Surely there must be better options for the youngsters who remain?

A thousand children’s mothers.

Mahboba Rawi, a lady, believes the new government would leave her alone to continue her job. Rawi, the self-proclaimed “mother of a thousand children,” is an Afghan lady residing in Australia whose organization operates four orphanages, five schools, and a medical facility in Afghanistan. But she is concerned, and her staff members paint a bleak picture of what is going on on the ground. Her company and other people.

About Zahid Shaukat

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